National survey to investigate social distancing restrictions

­Griffith University researchers have launched a national survey to track people’s social distancing and other COVID-19 recommended preventative behaviours.

The research aims to understand what people are (and are not) doing to help governments and other organisations around the world make decisions on how best to respond to social practices regarding COVID-19.

The research is led by Associate Professor Josh Byrnes and Dr Jean Spinks at the Centre for Applied Health Economics, Professor Sharyn Rundle-Thiele from Social Marketing @ Griffith and Associate Professor Dennis Petrie at the Monash University Centre for Health Economics.

“With the support of the Australian community, we hope to track what people are doing as restrictions change to learn what is and what isn’t working,” Associate Professor Byrnes said.

“People are facing very real and difficult choices. Social distancing restrictions can have a significant impact on a person’s livelihood and quality of life but at the same time helps reduce the chance of either themselves, those they care for and other Australians contracting COVID-19.”

“Social distancing restrictions vary from state to state so it will be interesting to see how people are responding to different recommendations. While Queensland families can go outdoors on picnics people in NSW can invite a friend around for coffee.”

People who complete the survey will receive feedback showing them what other Australians are doing.  The survey delivers real-time information to those supporting the research.

“It’s important because understanding what motivates people to comply with social distancing rules and guidelines will enable governments to formulate best-practice measures. It’s about keeping everyone safe.”

The study consists of:

  1. An initial survey to understand more about your current situation to understand what measures you are currently taking. This survey will take no more than five minutes to complete; and
  2. A very short weekly follow-up survey (which will take up to two minutes to complete).